DCoE Blog

  • Real Warriors: Roles of Family, Loved Ones in Substance Misuse
    Serviceman hugging his family.
    U.S. Army National Guard photo by Chief Warrant Officer Kiel Skager

    Substance misuse affects the entire family, and understanding how to cope is important. The road to recovery isn’t easy; it takes a fair amount of time and effort.

    The Real Warriors Campaign recently published an article about what to do – and not do – when you are concerned about a loved one’s substance misuse.

  • Working With Your Provider: Does Rank Impact Therapy?
    Graphic showing various military insignia
    Graphic courtesy of Deployment Health Clinical Center

    Getting medical treatment and therapy from the Military Health System can pose unique challenges. For example, sometimes the issue of military rank comes up. What happens when a health care provider is lower ranking than the patient? Does rank affect the doctor-patient relationship?

    Retired Capt. Richard D. Bergthold shares his experiences with military rank in the treatment setting below. Bergthold is the Navy Clinical Psychology Internship Program director at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.

  • Congressional Brief: ‘We’re Making Progress, but Not Yet Claiming Victory’
    Photo of Cpt. Colston

    I recently testified in front of the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Military Personnel. My conversation with members of Congress offered an excellent chance to highlight our efforts to promote psychological health and to prevent, diagnose and treat traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the military. ...I shared many of our accomplishments with the committee and I want to share a few with you below. I believe they reveal the important advances we made, provide an understanding of where we should target future research, and encourage more investments in medical research.

                  

  • 5 Steps to Take Charge of Your Mental Health
    U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Trevor Kohlrus

    Medical check-ups allow you to monitor your physical well-being; however, your health care shouldn’t stop there. How often do you check on your mental health? If not so often, here are five steps to help you take charge of your mental health.

    Step 1: Look for Mental Health Providers

    Finding the right mental health provider can be a challenge. The Defense Center of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) Outreach Center can help you get started. Professionals are available 24/7 by phone at 866-966-1020, online chat or email to listen to your questions and connect you with a specialist in your area of need.  

  • What Do You Call a Military Patient?
    Graphic courtesy of Deployment Health Clinical Center

    The chain of command in the military offers structure, denotes a clear line of responsibility and tasks, and maintains overall order. While the rank structure is essential to an effective military, it can be tricky for mental health providers to know how to address their military patients. In addition to rank, service members may go by last names, job titles, nick names, etc. So just what do you call a member of the military?

    This excerpt from a Clinician’s Corner post, written by Navy Capt. (Dr.) Carrie Kennedy, director of the Deployment Health Clinical Center, highlights her perspective on how to address military patients seeking mental health support:

     

  • Experts Discuss How Brain Injury Affects Communication Skills
    U.S. Navy photo by Jason Bortz

    How a service member communicates with others can change after a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    “People with TBI speak better than they communicate,” said Linda Picon, Department of Veterans Affairs senior consultant and liaison for TBI at the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Picon and Inbal Eshel, Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center senior principal scientist, are a duo with more than 35 years of experience studying and treating TBI patients. They shared with us how TBI can cause communication disorders.

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