DCoE Blog

  • Managing Suicide Risk, Access to Firearms: Guidelines for Providers
    Grahpic with text "Firearms are the most common method of suicide among active-duty personnel.  Approximately 64 percent of suidcides in 21014 were by personally owned firearms.
    Graphic courtesy of Deployment Health Clinical Center.

    Suicide is a sensitive topic, and discussing the ways people take their own lives can be extremely difficult. It is important that providers are aware of and able to openly discuss guidelines for managing suicide. In this recent Deployment Clinical Health Center blog, Navy Lt. Marcus Van Sickle answers questions related to firearm access and suicide.

    I have a patient who may be at risk for suicide and I know the patient owns a gun. What can I do?

  • How to Stay the Course for Good Mental Health

    "Whatever is worth doing at all, is worth doing well."
    - Philip Stanhope

    Man in battle dress fatigues clutching hair in frustration
    U.S. Air Force illustration by Airman 1st Class Destinee Dougherty

    Seeking help and committing to treatment for a mental health challenge is one of the best investments you can make. Yet treatment is rarely quick or simple. It demands your time, energy and attention, which can be draining or discouraging.

    If you feel treatment isn’t helping, you may consider giving up on medication or therapy, or even decide that you don’t need them at all. But before you throw in the towel, consider these facts about mental health treatment.

  • Military Spouse Leads TBI Champion to Recovery

    Coming home after deployment can be an eye-opening experience for service members and their families. Just as it is important for service members to stay aware of their surroundings on and off the battlefield, it is important for family members to prepare when they return home. A Head for the Future illustrates how important awareness is when facing a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    During a firefight while deployed, a 7.62 round bounced off of Army Sgt. 1st Class Bradley Lee’s helmet. He didn’t think anything of it at the time and continued on as if nothing had happened. After all, Lee thought that his “body was a machine and that it would do anything if you simply feed it.”

     

  • DVBIC Podcast Looks at Substance Use after TBI
    Bottle of liquor.
    Photo courtesy of II Marine Expeditionary Force

    Army Capt. Daniel Hines knew something was wrong with his friend. Normally a model soldier and enthusiastic recruiter for the Army, the friend was now complaining of burnout, acting irritable and getting into bar fights.

    “If there hadn’t been an intervention, I believe he would have just spiraled out of control,” Hines said. “He would have been arrested; he would have ruined that stellar career he had.”

    Hines’ friend had a traumatic brain injury (TBI) following several blast exposures. He began struggling with TBI and substance abuse. This dangerous combination was the focus of a recent episode of The TBI Family, a podcast series by the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC).

  • Military Sexual Assault Affects Everyone
    silhouettes of three men with blue ribbon in corner

    Sexual assault affects all service members within the Defense Department, regardless of their gender.

    The Deployment Health Clinical Center recently published an article about the sexual assault of male service members – a group of survivors often overlooked.

    Sexual Assault Awareness Month is a time to talk openly about a topic that we should all be concerned about: sexual assault and harassment of U.S. military members. Sexual assault not only devastates the individual who is harmed, but it also hurts the morale of the unit and of everyone involved, and critically impairs the mission of the Department of Defense (DoD).

  • Military Parents Resources for Kids
    Military family celebrating homecoming

    Military life can be challenging for the children of service members, but it can be easier. The National Center for Telehealth and Technology shares resources for parents and kids to help tackle their worries in its latest blog post.

    If you’re a parent, you worry about your children and how to take care of them. If you are a military parent, you have additional worries:

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