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  • Manage Your Screens for Sweeter Dreams

    Read the full story: Manage Your Screens for Sweeter Dreams

    We all know that a good night’s rest is important for our health, but sleep can be hard to come by. Many of our daily habits can make it hard to fall asleep consistently, especially habits that involve electronics and screens. Learn how managing your screen exposure can make it easier to rest easy with this infographic!

    But wait, there’s more! We have more resources to help improve your sleep…

  • Your Electronics May be Ruining Your Sleep

    Do you spend countless hours at night playing video games, watching TV and trolling on social media? Are you having trouble falling asleep? Using electronic devices more often for longer periods of time has a negative impact on sleep, according to a recent study presented at a webinar hosted by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Dec. 3.

    Sleep-wake cycles, hormone release, body temperature and other important bodily functions are controlled by a person’s circadian rhythm over a 24-hour period of time. Light exposure can disrupt sleep and affect the circadian rhythm, which is why research is looking at how the increased use of electronics may be impacting our sleep. TV, computers, tablets and cell phones all produce what is referred to as blue light waves in dark rooms during night hours.

  • You Can Manage Holiday Stress, These Apps will Help

    The holidays don’t always go as well as I’d like. Based on the story below from a Washington Post annual online sharing of holiday horror stories, that’s true for a lot of people:

    “We were doing a southwest theme so I was making a tequila lime turkey. I'm used to using wine for cooking and will often just dump more in if the sauce needs it. I checked on the turkey, realized the sauce needed a little more tequila, poured it over the turkey, mixed the sauce in the roasting pan, and put it back in the oven. About five minutes later I was standing by the sink. The oven door went flying open, there was a very loud WHOOOSH noise, and a giant fireball came shooting out the oven door.”

  • Preventive Health: Tackle Life’s Challenges with Help from Self-Care Website

    Read: Preventive Health: Tackle Life’s Challenges with Help from Self-Care Website

    He considered suicide, worried about his uncle’s role in his father’s death, and thought his girlfriend was spying on him.

    If Hamlet had tools for his mental health concerns, his story might have ended differently.

    While Shakespeare’s famous character faced unique problems, self-doubt is universal and anyone can struggle with anxiety, paranoia or depression.

    It can be hard to figure out whether relationship problems or other issues are serious or temporary. If you’re trying to decide whether to take action on a problem, check out the assessments on the After Deployment website and its companion app, LifeArmor. The assessments, which cover a wide range of issues, are an “early-warning system” that an emotional, physical or psychological challenge may require professional help, according to research psychologist David Bradshaw of the National Center for Telehealth and Technology.

    “It’s a way to get some information and some help before things get worse,” Bradshaw said.

  • Q&A: Legal Tips for Telehealth Mental Counseling [Part Two]

    Read the story: Q&A: Legal Tips for Telehealth Mental Counseling [Part Two]
    U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Rebekka Heite

    This is part two of a two-part series that summarizes tips offered during a recent webinar by Bryan T. Wheeler, deputy general counsel for the Defense Health Agency, on some of the legal and ethical issues involved in counseling service members online or via phone. Part one of the series covered general issues. This post addresses questions related specifically to the use of email and mobile apps.

    The rapid growth of websites, apps and other mobile technology to help mental health providers virtually communicate with patients presents new opportunities to reach service members and veterans. However, this tech-enabled practice, known as telemedicine or telehealth, raises some legal concerns for providers.

    Defense Health Agency Deputy General Counsel Bryan T. Wheeler addressed some of these concerns during a recent webinar.

  • Q&A: Legal Tips for Telehealth Mental Counseling [Part One]

    Read the story: Q&A: Legal Tips for Telehealth Mental Counseling [Part One]
    U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Shejal Pulivarti

    This post is part one of a two-part series that summarizes tips offered during a recent webinar by Bryan T. Wheeler, deputy general counsel for the Defense Health Agency, on some of the legal and ethical issues involved in counseling service members online or via phone. Part one of the series covers general issues; part two will address questions related specifically to email and mobile apps.

    The rapid growth of websites, apps and other mobile technology to help mental health providers virtually communicate with patients presents new opportunities to reach service members and veterans. However, this tech-enabled practice, known as telemedicine or telehealth, raises some legal concerns for providers.

    Defense Health Agency Deputy General Counsel Bryan T. Wheeler addressed some of these concerns during a recent webinar.