DCoE Blog

  • 5 Steps to Take Charge of Your Mental Health
    U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Trevor Kohlrus

    Medical check-ups allow you to monitor your physical well-being; however, your health care shouldn’t stop there. How often do you check on your mental health? If not so often, here are five steps to help you take charge of your mental health.

    Step 1: Look for Mental Health Providers

    Finding the right mental health provider can be a challenge. The Defense Center of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) Outreach Center can help you get started. Professionals are available 24/7 by phone at 866-966-1020, online chat or email to listen to your questions and connect you with a specialist in your area of need.  

  • 10 Mental Health Blogs You Don’t Want to Miss
    U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Chad Strohmeyer

    The Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) strives to provide the most up-to-date information and resources on research, tools and services available for the military community. DCoE, including its centers and campaigns, produces blog posts to help make the information available to everyone, and easier to understand.

  • How to Walk Away from Tobacco
    Image  of used cigarettes.
    U.S. Army photo by Rachel Larue

    Quitting tobacco is hard. In fact, it’s common for people to relapse several times before kicking the habit completely. Whether your preference is lighting a cigarette or using a smokeless variety, tobacco can be difficult to part with.

    As bad habits go, smoking is pretty common: More than 15 percent of Americans use cigarettes.

    Quitting can have huge benefits for your health. Those who stop smoking experience lower blood pressure, reduce coughing and phlegm, and decrease their risk of cancer and heart disease.

  • These 6 Tools Can Help You Manage Your Mental Health
    Man doing knee bends, man meditating, and man reading.
    U.S. Air Force illustration by Airman 1st Class Destinee Dougherty

    Mental health is an important part of our overall wellness. Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) offers many tools for helping you keep yours in good shape.

    Whether you are looking to improve your own mental health, or find tools to help your spouse or children, DCoE has a resource ready to help.

     

  • Military Parents Resources for Kids
    Military family celebrating homecoming

    Military life can be challenging for the children of service members, but it can be easier. The National Center for Telehealth and Technology shares resources for parents and kids to help tackle their worries in its latest blog post.

    If you’re a parent, you worry about your children and how to take care of them. If you are a military parent, you have additional worries:

  • When the Blues Last Beyond Winter

    Although it is spring and the days are getting longer in the northern hemisphere, the lingering cold and harsh weather can limit your exposure to sunshine. People in areas with less sunshine may experience feelings of sadness, fatigue or hopelessness. A form of depression, called seasonal affective disorder (SAD), can affect people in low-light conditions.

    Seasonal affective disorder occurs when fluctuating and decreasing levels of sunlight cause imbalances in your serotonin levels. The resulting depression can lead to difficulty getting out of bed in the morning or reduced interest in activities.

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