DCoE Blog

  • Things You Need to Know About Depression

    Read the full story: Things You Need to Know About Depression

    Although people use the words depressed or depression to refer to a sad mood, it is much more than just a bad day. Depression is a complicated condition with many aspects.

    According to the National Institute for Mental Health, depression is a common but serious mood disorder. It causes severe symptoms that affect how you feel, think, and handle daily activities, such as sleeping, eating or working. Misunderstandings about depression can hinder proper identification and treatment. Additionally, the signs and effects of depression can differ from person to person. The Deployment Health Clinical Center outlines six key aspects of depression:

  • Clinical Guidelines for Suicide Prevention

    Read the full story: Clinical Guidelines for Suicide Prevention

    Suicide is a significant problem for the Defense Department. For providers, an essential piece of suicide prevention is a proven, step-by-step approach to treating potentially suicidal patients. A recent webinar presented by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury highlighted how the military constantly updates its suicide clinical practice guidelines.

    Eric Rodgers, director of the evidence-based practice program at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), talked about the standards and procedures for updating these guidelines.

    Suicide clinical practice guidelines undergo review by evidence-based practice workgroups. Workgroups include representatives from VA and the Defense Department, as well as individuals from multiple disciplines. They incorporate patient input and identify how new guidelines will affect treatment outcomes. The groups which oversee the suicide guidelines include members specifically chosen to address the subject of suicide.

    Guidelines often need multiple reviews before approval. In some cases they may not meet standards for approval at all.

  • ICYMI: Hot-topic Blogs of 2016

    Read the full story: ICYMI: Hot-topic Blogs of 2016

    Throughout 2016, the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE), National Center for Telehealth and Technology, AfterDeployment, Real Warriors Campaign and A Head for the Future addressed many issues related to psychological health and traumatic brain injury on their respective blogs.

    These articles featured ways to prevent, recognize and treat depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), or traumatic brain injury (TBI); tips for better sleep; how to manage sports injuries; and more.

  • Depression Symptoms Can Increase with Concussion

    Read the full story: Depression Symptoms Can Increase with Concussion
    U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Teddy Wade

    Many service members who sustain a concussion also cope with depression. There is a distinct connection between depression and traumatic brain injury (TBI). In fact, depression diagnoses increase after a brain injury.

    “Sometimes the challenge is [that] post-concussive syndrome can sound the same as depression,” said Kelvin Lim, principal investigator for the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center location at the Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Health Care System. “It is important to be aware of overlap between the two.”

    TBI and Depression

    Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center research found that depression can strongly influence post-concussion symptoms following a concussion. The study shows that patients who are diagnosed with both a concussion and depression report more severe symptoms than patients with only a concussion.

    Asking the right questions can help providers prescribe the right treatment. Through targeted questioning a provider can distinguish if the patient’s post-concussive symptoms are similar to depression, or if the patient is experiencing co-occurring conditions. The right questions can lead to the right diagnosis. The right diagnosis leads to the right treatment.

  • 6 Mobile Apps to Help You Fight Depression

    Read the full story: 6 Mobile Apps to Help You Fight Depression
    U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Ryan L. Tomlinson

    For a quick look at depression in the United States, check out these statistics:

    • Depression is one of the most common mental disorders in our country, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.
    • Our country ranks third as the most depressed country in the world, according to the World Health Organization.
    • Approximately one in five adult Americans experiences some form of mental illness each year, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

    With reports like these, we should keep tools to fight depression handy. The National Center for Telehealth and Technology (T2), with the Department of Veterans Affairs, designs tools like apps for your smartphone. And these days, there are few things handier than a mobile app.

  • Defense Department News: Military Crisis Line Specialist Helps Fellow Veterans

    Read the full story: Defense Department News: Military Crisis Line Specialist Helps Fellow Veterans

    Knowing where to turn in a time of crisis is important. Many of us have family members, fellow service members, colleagues or friends we can reach out to. But, it’s not always easy, or best, to talk about what we’re going through with someone close to us. A recent Defense Department article explores how a crisis line specialist helps other veterans.

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