DCoE Blog

  • Experts Discuss How Brain Injury Affects Communication Skills
    U.S. Navy photo by Jason Bortz

    How a service member communicates with others can change after a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    “People with TBI speak better than they communicate,” said Linda Picon, Department of Veterans Affairs senior consultant and liaison for TBI at the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Picon and Inbal Eshel, Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center senior principal scientist, are a duo with more than 35 years of experience studying and treating TBI patients. They shared with us how TBI can cause communication disorders.

  • Veteran Recovers from TBI with Help from Adaptive Sports, Family
    Veterans at Warrior Games
    Image courtesy of A Head for the Future

    There are different treatment paths and activities that help someone recover from traumatic brain injury (TBI). In searching for what works, some veterans learn a new skill or find a new passion. A Head for the Future spotlights a veteran who uses adaptive sports and family support to help in recovery.

    When Air Force veteran Tech. Sgt. Krys Bowman returned home from another deployment, his wife, Lacey, noticed changes. Addressing those changes resulted in a new way for Krys to give back and to get involved.

  • Military Spouse Leads TBI Champion to Recovery

    Coming home after deployment can be an eye-opening experience for service members and their families. Just as it is important for service members to stay aware of their surroundings on and off the battlefield, it is important for family members to prepare when they return home. A Head for the Future illustrates how important awareness is when facing a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    During a firefight while deployed, a 7.62 round bounced off of Army Sgt. 1st Class Bradley Lee’s helmet. He didn’t think anything of it at the time and continued on as if nothing had happened. After all, Lee thought that his “body was a machine and that it would do anything if you simply feed it.”

     

  • DVBIC Podcast Looks at Substance Use after TBI
    Bottle of liquor.
    Photo courtesy of II Marine Expeditionary Force

    Army Capt. Daniel Hines knew something was wrong with his friend. Normally a model soldier and enthusiastic recruiter for the Army, the friend was now complaining of burnout, acting irritable and getting into bar fights.

    “If there hadn’t been an intervention, I believe he would have just spiraled out of control,” Hines said. “He would have been arrested; he would have ruined that stellar career he had.”

    Hines’ friend had a traumatic brain injury (TBI) following several blast exposures. He began struggling with TBI and substance abuse. This dangerous combination was the focus of a recent episode of The TBI Family, a podcast series by the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC).

  • DVBIC Podcast Provides Help for Family Caregivers
    Graphic image with text "The TBI Family"

    In a small brick house in northern Baltimore, Joann Anderson-West cares for two injured Army veterans whose families are unable to provide care. One of the veterans, Ralph Stepney, was placed with Anderson-West after he reached out to the Department of Veterans Affairs for help.

    “She's family,” Stepney said, “because she treats me like family. She's a very excellent cook. She has a beautiful home, and I'm very, very comfortable here and I enjoy life again.”

    Anderson-West’s story is one of many told by the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) in its ongoing podcast series, “The TBI Family.” Her story is part of an episode that discusses foster care and cognitive rehabilitation for those with a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

  • Celebrating Milestones through 25 Years of DVBIC
    DVBIC Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center 25 years of service, 1992-2017

    This year marks 25 years since a congressional mandate created the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Program in response to the first Gulf War and the need to treat service members with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Service members and veterans impacted by TBI rely on the program, known today as the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC), to propel TBI clinical care, groundbreaking research and innovative education.

    Over its 25 years, DVBIC has reached a number of pivotal milestones in the advancement of TBI care that continue to impact prevention and treatment today.

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