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  • Webinar Addresses Technology Innovations for TBI

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    U.S. Army photo by Maj. Deanna Bague

    Technology solutions come out so quickly that we’ve all heard “there’s an app for that!” Integrating these tools into how health care providers assess and treat traumatic brain injury (TBI) is increasingly important, for military members, veterans and their families, said experts during a recent webinar hosted by National Center for Telehealth & Technology (T2), a Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) center.

    “Technology is becoming a bigger part of our daily lives and provides a unique resource, using mobile apps and websites, for how we provide care to military members suffering from brain injuries,” said David C. Cooper, a psychologist with the Mobile Health Program at T2.

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  • Military Care Coordinators Learn to Identify Brain Injuries, PTSD

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    For the 18 military care coordinators in the room, the serious topics under discussion—brain injuries and psychological health--eclipse the lazy beams of afternoon sun shining into the second-floor training room in Shirlington, Virginia.

    The men and women, representing many military departments, were there to learn how to recognize the signs and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) in warfighters. Learning how to identify these signs gives care coordinators the ability to make referrals to the experts who will provide proper treatment.

    PTSD is a clinically-diagnosed condition that can happen to people who have experienced one or more traumatic events. TBI is caused by a blow or jolt to the head that disrupts the normal function of the brain. Mild TBI, also known as concussion, is the most common form of TBI in the military.

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  • Honoring our Veterans

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    Navy Captain Richard F. Stoltz

    Last week our nation’s citizens had the opportunity to freely exercise their right to vote when so many others across the globe do not share the same freedom. Now we look ahead to honoring America's veterans for protecting that right to vote, their patriotism, and love of country. Their willingness to serve and sacrifice for the common good ensures our nation remains independent and free. I am grateful for the opportunity to serve as the Director of an organization that works to provide for the psychological health and traumatic brain injury needs of our service members.

    We think not only of the veterans of recent conflicts, but also those from prior years, from World War II to Korea to Vietnam and beyond. Young or old, they all deserve our respect and support.

    Since 9/11, our nation has experienced a long period of conflict involving multiple deployments for many in our all-volunteer force.

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  • Chaplains Serve on Front Lines to Combat Anxiety, Suicide

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    Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Daniel Palermo

    During 22 years as a Navy chaplain, Jeff Rhodes was often approached by troubled sailors and Marines. They didn’t want to pray; they wanted to talk confidentially about relationship trouble, stress or even suicidal impulses.  

    “When they came to see me, they knew they had a safe place where they could pretty much say what they wanted to say,” Rhodes said. “As a military chaplain, I couldn’t talk to their commander unless they gave me permission.”

    Rhodes, who trained in clinical counseling while getting a doctorate in ministry at Boston University, says he could usually tell if someone needed psychological help: “If their affect was not good, if they didn’t have spontaneity, if they talked about things that made them sad on a chronic basis.

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  • TBI Recovery: You Don't Have to Do It on Your Own

    Read the full story: TBI Recovery: You Don't Have to Do It on Your Own

    For more than a year, Carolyn Donahue, a support specialist with a defense program for brain-injured service members, kept in touch with Sam (not his real name), who said he appreciated her calls but insisted he didn’t need extra help.

    Like many service members, Sam, a 43-year-old Army veteran who was knocked unconscious in an armored SUV during his service in the Middle East and later re-injured in a motorcycle accident, was accustomed to toughing it out.

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  • Women and Girls Face Greater Concussion Risk in Sports

    Read the full story: Women and Girls Face Greater Concussion Risk in Sports
    DVIDS photo

    In sports played by both girls and boys, research shows that girls are more likely to suffer concussions and to be more seriously injured by them, an associate professor at Michigan State University told attendees of a webinar hosted October 9 by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    “Females are at a higher risk for concussion than male athletes,” said Tracy Covassin, Ph.D., who is also director of Michigan State’s Sport-Related Concussion Laboratory. “It’s even a higher risk than the typical college football athlete.”

    Six out of every 10,000 men who play ice hockey or lacrosse in college suffer concussions, she said, while 4.2 of every 10,000 men playing soccer do. The figures for college women are 7 per 10,000 for ice hockey, 6.7 for soccer, and 6.2 for lacrosse, according to a 2013 study by the National Collegiate and Athletic Association.

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