News

  • Providers: Learn Basic Steps to Assess Suicide Risk of Service Members
    By following basic steps for suicide risk assessment, providers can mitigate risk of overdose for patients starting opioid therapy
    Graphic courtesy of Deployment Health Clinical Center

    A recent Deployment Health Clinical Center (DHCC) Clinician’s Corner blog highlighted what providers need to know to complete a comprehensive suicide risk assessment. Dr. Jennifer Tucker, a clinical psychologist at DHCC, discussed the specific questions providers should ask, what information to gather from the patient, and how to evaluate common risk and protective factors.

    The increasing focus on stemming the tide of the opioid epidemic in the U.S. has highlighted the risk for opioid overdose in individuals who are or become suicidal while taking opioids. In order to mitigate overdose risk, the 2017 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for Opioid Therapy for Chronic Pain  advises prescribers and other clinicians working with opioids to assess their patients for suicide risk before initiating long-term opioid therapy as well as when continuing treatment.

  • Annual DOD Psychological Health, TBI Summit Features State of Science
    Coming soon DCoE 2017 Summit banner with #DCoESummit17 and #StateoftheScience
    Graphic by Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Heath & Traumatic Brain Injury

    The 2017 Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) Summit themed, “Advances in the State of the Science and Best Practices,” begins Tuesday. The live, virtual summit will run until Thursday. Health care providers, researchers and service members are encouraged to join.

    Registration for the summit will remain open through the event, but it’s a good idea to register as early as possible to secure a spot. View the summit agenda for the full list of presentations to help plan your days.

  • TBI Experts Brief Draft Consensus Statements at MHS Research Symposium
    MHSRS will be held August 27-30, 2017 at the Gaylord Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee, FL
    Graphic courtesy of Defense Health Agency

    The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DBVIC) and interagency working groups are presenting draft traumatic brain injury (TBI) consensus statements during breakout sessions at the annual Military Health System (MHS) Research Symposium. Their goal is to review the current state of the science for TBI clinical care, distill recent TBI research for use in clinical practice, and identify areas that deserve further investigation.

    Work groups conducted weekly or bi-weekly teleconferences to review evidence and draft consensus statements. Topics were developed, reviewed and approved by the TBI Advisory Committee and support the MHS TBI Pathway of Care.

  • Experts Talk Knowledge Translation, Benefits for Military Health System
    Graphic courtesy of the Defense Health Agency

    Researchers from all over the globe gathered this week at the annual Defense Department Military Health System Research Symposium (MHSRS). Known as the top military medical conference in the world, it is an academic-based venue for professionals to talk, learn and share with each other. The focus of this year’s event was how military medical experts use cutting-edge research to improve care for the warfighter.

    Dr. Richard Stoltz, Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) acting director, spoke at this year’s MHSRS. Along with colleagues, Stoltz introduced the knowledge translation process developed at DCoE. He focused his discussion on how using a systematic approach and best practices can impact military psychological health challenges.

  • Knowledge Translation: What is it, How Will it Help?

    Researchers gather at the annual Military Health System Research Symposium (MHSRS) to share new discoveries from military-unique research. This event is the only meeting that focuses on the specific medical needs of the warfighter. One topic of discussion at this year’s symposium is knowledge translation.

    On average, it takes over a decade before medical research is accepted and put into clinical practice at hospitals or clinics – too long a wait for those who need treatment. Knowledge translation can help speed that up. It’s basically a process to take medical research findings and put them into evidenced-based treatments in a more timely and useful way. A successful process is one that is standardized and adaptable.

    Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) and Defense Health Agency are working together with other agencies to standardize knowledge translation processes for the Military Health System (MHS). The overall goal is to ensure service members and veterans continue to have access to the latest and best treatments available.

  • ‘Tech into Care’ Pilot Aims to Help Providers Use Mobile Apps with Patient Care
    The five mobile apps pictured: breathe to relax, life armor, PTSD coach, T2 mood tracker, and virtual hope box
    Graphic courtesy of Deployment Health Clinical Center

    A recent National Center for Telehealth & Technology (T2) survey explored the barriers that military health care providers face when they try to use technology with psychological health treatment. In response, Deployment Health Clinical Center (DHCC) launched a pilot program to offer solutions. The Tech into Care pilot will help providers at Navy and Air Force behavioral health clinics use five popular mobile apps with their treatment practices.
     

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