DCoE Blog

  • Psychological Health Center Highlights How Commanders Can Help Service Member Wellness
    Marine in combat year talking on radio.
    U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Andrew Huff

    There are many factors that impact service members’ overall well-being. Like many things in life, it often takes a team approach when there are obstacles. Service members benefit when mental health providers and commanders communicate effectively. For example, commanders can help improve the environment for soldiers’ wellness.

    The Deployment Health Clinical Center discusses how providers can build rapport with a patient’s command, adhere to command disclosure policies and make decisive recommendations.

     

  • Veteran Recovers from TBI with Help from Adaptive Sports, Family
    Veterans at Warrior Games
    Image courtesy of A Head for the Future

    There are different treatment paths and activities that help someone recover from traumatic brain injury (TBI). In searching for what works, some veterans learn a new skill or find a new passion. A Head for the Future spotlights a veteran who uses adaptive sports and family support to help in recovery.

    When Air Force veteran Tech. Sgt. Krys Bowman returned home from another deployment, his wife, Lacey, noticed changes. Addressing those changes resulted in a new way for Krys to give back and to get involved.

  • These 6 Tools Can Help You Manage Your Mental Health
    Man squatting, man reading and man meditating
    U.S. Air Force illustration by Airman 1st Class Destinee Dougherty

    Mental health is an important part of our overall wellness. Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) offers many tools for helping you keep yours in good shape.

    Whether you are looking to improve your own mental health, or find tools to help your spouse or children, DCoE has a resource ready to help.

     

  • Managing Suicide Risk, Access to Firearms: Guidelines for Providers
    Grahpic with text "Firearms are the most common method of suicide among active-duty personnel.  Approximately 64 percent of suidcides in 21014 were by personally owned firearms.
    Graphic courtesy of Deployment Health Clinical Center.

    Suicide is a sensitive topic, and discussing the ways people take their own lives can be extremely difficult. It is important that providers are aware of and able to openly discuss guidelines for managing suicide. In this recent Deployment Clinical Health Center blog, Navy Lt. Marcus Van Sickle answers questions related to firearm access and suicide.

    I have a patient who may be at risk for suicide and I know the patient owns a gun. What can I do?

  • How to Stay the Course for Good Mental Health

    "Whatever is worth doing at all, is worth doing well."
    - Philip Stanhope

    Man in battle dress fatigues clutching hair in frustration
    U.S. Air Force illustration by Airman 1st Class Destinee Dougherty

    Seeking help and committing to treatment for a mental health challenge is one of the best investments you can make. Yet treatment is rarely quick or simple. It demands your time, energy and attention, which can be draining or discouraging.

    If you feel treatment isn’t helping, you may consider giving up on medication or therapy, or even decide that you don’t need them at all. But before you throw in the towel, consider these facts about mental health treatment.

  • Military Spouse Leads TBI Champion to Recovery

    Coming home after deployment can be an eye-opening experience for service members and their families. Just as it is important for service members to stay aware of their surroundings on and off the battlefield, it is important for family members to prepare when they return home. A Head for the Future illustrates how important awareness is when facing a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    During a firefight while deployed, a 7.62 round bounced off of Army Sgt. 1st Class Bradley Lee’s helmet. He didn’t think anything of it at the time and continued on as if nothing had happened. After all, Lee thought that his “body was a machine and that it would do anything if you simply feed it.”

     

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