News

  • Mom, Psychologist Shares How Laughter Can Strengthen Relationships
    U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Preston Cherry

    Laughing with a service member, family member or friend can be a fun and healthy way to connect. Julie Kinn, deputy director of the National Center of Telehealth and Technology Mobile Health Program, shares a family experience that makes her laugh until this day in a recent AfterDeployment blog post.

    Laughing about shared circumstances builds a sense of connection. Just be sure the shared memory is one that everyone finds funny (and not one that will make someone feel embarrassed or ashamed).

  • 5 Steps to Take Charge of Your Mental Health
    U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Trevor Kohlrus

    Medical check-ups allow you to monitor your physical well-being; however, your health care shouldn’t stop there. How often do you check on your mental health? If not so often, here are five steps to help you take charge of your mental health.

    Step 1: Look for Mental Health Providers

    Finding the right mental health provider can be a challenge. The Defense Center of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) Outreach Center can help you get started. Professionals are available 24/7 by phone at 866-966-1020, online chat or email to listen to your questions and connect you with a specialist in your area of need.  

  • 10 Mental Health Blogs You Don’t Want to Miss
    U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Chad Strohmeyer

    The Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) strives to provide the most up-to-date information and resources on research, tools and services available for the military community. DCoE, including its centers and campaigns, produces blog posts to help make the information available to everyone, and easier to understand.

  • Veteran Recovers from TBI with Help from Adaptive Sports, Family
    Veterans at Warrior Games
    Image courtesy of A Head for the Future

    There are different treatment paths and activities that help someone recover from traumatic brain injury (TBI). In searching for what works, some veterans learn a new skill or find a new passion. A Head for the Future spotlights a veteran who uses adaptive sports and family support to help in recovery.

    When Air Force veteran Tech. Sgt. Krys Bowman returned home from another deployment, his wife, Lacey, noticed changes. Addressing those changes resulted in a new way for Krys to give back and to get involved.

  • DVBIC Podcast Provides Help for Family Caregivers
    Graphic image with text "The TBI Family"

    In a small brick house in northern Baltimore, Joann Anderson-West cares for two injured Army veterans whose families are unable to provide care. One of the veterans, Ralph Stepney, was placed with Anderson-West after he reached out to the Department of Veterans Affairs for help.

    “She's family,” Stepney said, “because she treats me like family. She's a very excellent cook. She has a beautiful home, and I'm very, very comfortable here and I enjoy life again.”

    Anderson-West’s story is one of many told by the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) in its ongoing podcast series, “The TBI Family.” Her story is part of an episode that discusses foster care and cognitive rehabilitation for those with a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

  • VIDEO: Watch Service Members Share Experiences with TBI Recovery

    A Head for the Future presents three compelling stories about getting help

    Jennifer, a military spouse, spoke up when she noticed symptoms in her husband, Army Sgt. 1st Class Bradley Lee. Air Force veteran Staff Sgt. Tina Garcia used a beauty pageant to raise awareness about her injury and recovery. And Air Force veteran Tech. Sgt. Krys Bowman took up adaptive sports to support his recovery.

    Group of athletes in blue Warrior Games

    In advance of Brain Injury Awareness Month, which we recognize every March, a Defense Department traumatic brain injury (TBI) initiative released new video profiles featuring the inspiring stories of three military members who experienced brain injury and sought help to recover. The videos, released under the A Head for the Future initiative, are available on the A Head for the Future website and on the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury’s YouTube channel.