News

  • From the Clinic to Your Smartphone: Using Mobile Apps to Improve Care
    Example of various mobile apps
    DoD photo by Sidney Hinds

    For many, mobile devices are an efficient way to help with health care. According to studies, 77 percent of Americans own a smartphone and have access to millions of mobile apps. Many of those apps exist to support mental health.

    Dr. Christina Armstrong, program lead for the education and training program at the National Center for Telehealth and Technology (T2), discussed advantages of mobile health technology during a recent webinar. The webinar highlighted telehealth capabilities and strategies for making apps a more common tool used in clinical settings.

    The benefits of mobile health technology in clinical care include overcoming barriers, increasing patient engagement, and improving patient reports of symptoms, said Armstrong, also a clinical psychologist.

  • ‘Tech into Care’ Pilot Aims to Help Providers Use Mobile Apps with Patient Care
    The five mobile apps pictured: breathe to relax, life armor, PTSD coach, T2 mood tracker, and virtual hope box
    Graphic courtesy of Deployment Health Clinical Center

    A recent National Center for Telehealth & Technology (T2) survey explored the barriers that military health care providers face when they try to use technology with psychological health treatment. In response, Deployment Health Clinical Center (DHCC) launched a pilot program to offer solutions. The Tech into Care pilot will help providers at Navy and Air Force behavioral health clinics use five popular mobile apps with their treatment practices.
     

  • New DOD Mobile App Helps Defuse Nightmares for Better Sleep
    Dream EZ

    Being ambushed in a firefight but can’t escape to safety. Being chased and can’t find safe shelter. Flying through the air after an explosion flips your vehicle. From reliving our worst experiences to playing on our deepest fears, bad dreams – nightmares – can not only interrupt our rest, they can make us afraid to even go to sleep.

    Nightmares are a normal way for the brain to process a traumatic event. Isolated nightmares are normal, but when dreams that consist of flashbacks, unwanted memories, visceral fear or anxiety recur often, they can become a debilitating sleep disorder, according to research done by the National Center for PTSD. The Defense Department’s National Center for Telehealth & Technology (T2) has developed a new mobile application to help users rewrite bad dreams to reduce the frequency and intensity of nightmares. The app, called Dream EZ, is based on a nightmare treatment called imagery rehearsal therapy (IRT).

  • Your Electronics May be Ruining Your Sleep
    Sleep
    U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Denoris Mickle

    Do you spend countless hours at night playing video games, watching TV and trolling on social media? Are you having trouble falling asleep? Using electronic devices more often for longer periods of time has a negative impact on sleep, according to a recent study presented at a webinar hosted by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Dec. 3.

    Sleep-wake cycles, hormone release, body temperature and other important bodily functions are controlled by a person’s circadian rhythm over a 24-hour period of time. Light exposure can disrupt sleep and affect the circadian rhythm, which is why research is looking at how the increased use of electronics may be impacting our sleep. TV, computers, tablets and cell phones all produce what is referred to as blue light waves in dark rooms during night hours.

  • You Can Manage Holiday Stress, These Apps will Help
    Manage Holiday Stress!

    The holidays don’t always go as well as I’d like. Based on the story below from a Washington Post annual online sharing of holiday horror stories, that’s true for a lot of people:

    “We were doing a southwest theme so I was making a tequila lime turkey. I'm used to using wine for cooking and will often just dump more in if the sauce needs it. I checked on the turkey, realized the sauce needed a little more tequila, poured it over the turkey, mixed the sauce in the roasting pan, and put it back in the oven. About five minutes later I was standing by the sink. The oven door went flying open, there was a very loud WHOOOSH noise, and a giant fireball came shooting out the oven door.”
  • Sesame Street for Military Families Offers Help from Any Device
    DCoE's Facebook Album: Sesame Street Event: Families Near and Far
    Photo courtesy of Sesame Workshop

    Sesame Workshop and the Defense Department’s National Center for Telehealth & Technology (T2) announced the launch of a website designed for military families today.

    The Sesame Street for Military Families website features beloved Sesame Street characters to help preschool military children cope with military life challenges, such as the deployment of a parent, moving to a new home, and the injury or even death of a parent.

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