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  • 5 Steps to Take Charge of Your Mental Health
    U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Trevor Kohlrus

    Medical check-ups allow you to monitor your physical well-being; however, your health care shouldn’t stop there. How often do you check on your mental health? If not so often, here are five steps to help you take charge of your mental health.

    Step 1: Look for Mental Health Providers

    Finding the right mental health provider can be a challenge. The Defense Center of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) Outreach Center can help you get started. Professionals are available 24/7 by phone at 866-966-1020, online chat or email to listen to your questions and connect you with a specialist in your area of need.  

  • How to Walk Away from Tobacco
    Image  of used cigarettes.
    U.S. Army photo by Rachel Larue

    Quitting tobacco is hard. In fact, it’s common for people to relapse several times before kicking the habit completely. Whether your preference is lighting a cigarette or using a smokeless variety, tobacco can be difficult to part with.

    As bad habits go, smoking is pretty common: More than 15 percent of Americans use cigarettes.

    Quitting can have huge benefits for your health. Those who stop smoking experience lower blood pressure, reduce coughing and phlegm, and decrease their risk of cancer and heart disease.

  • These 6 Tools Can Help You Manage Your Mental Health
    Man squatting, man reading and man meditating
    U.S. Air Force illustration by Airman 1st Class Destinee Dougherty

    Mental health is an important part of our overall wellness. Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) offers many tools for helping you keep yours in good shape.

    Whether you are looking to improve your own mental health, or find tools to help your spouse or children, DCoE has a resource ready to help.

     

  • Managing Suicide Risk, Access to Firearms: Guidelines for Providers
    Grahpic with text "Firearms are the most common method of suicide among active-duty personnel.  Approximately 64 percent of suidcides in 21014 were by personally owned firearms.
    Graphic courtesy of Deployment Health Clinical Center.

    Suicide is a sensitive topic, and discussing the ways people take their own lives can be extremely difficult. It is important that providers are aware of and able to openly discuss guidelines for managing suicide. In this recent Deployment Clinical Health Center blog, Navy Lt. Marcus Van Sickle answers questions related to firearm access and suicide.

    I have a patient who may be at risk for suicide and I know the patient owns a gun. What can I do?

  • How to Stay the Course for Good Mental Health

    "Whatever is worth doing at all, is worth doing well."
    - Philip Stanhope

    Man in battle dress fatigues clutching hair in frustration
    U.S. Air Force illustration by Airman 1st Class Destinee Dougherty

    Seeking help and committing to treatment for a mental health challenge is one of the best investments you can make. Yet treatment is rarely quick or simple. It demands your time, energy and attention, which can be draining or discouraging.

    If you feel treatment isn’t helping, you may consider giving up on medication or therapy, or even decide that you don’t need them at all. But before you throw in the towel, consider these facts about mental health treatment.

  • Military Sexual Assault Affects Everyone
    silhouettes of three men with blue ribbon in corner

    Sexual assault affects all service members within the Defense Department, regardless of their gender.

    The Deployment Health Clinical Center recently published an article about the sexual assault of male service members – a group of survivors often overlooked.

    Sexual Assault Awareness Month is a time to talk openly about a topic that we should all be concerned about: sexual assault and harassment of U.S. military members. Sexual assault not only devastates the individual who is harmed, but it also hurts the morale of the unit and of everyone involved, and critically impairs the mission of the Department of Defense (DoD).

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