News

  • Veteran Recovers from TBI with Help from Adaptive Sports, Family
    Veterans at Warrior Games
    Image courtesy of A Head for the Future

    There are different treatment paths and activities that help someone recover from traumatic brain injury (TBI). In searching for what works, some veterans learn a new skill or find a new passion. A Head for the Future spotlights a veteran who uses adaptive sports and family support to help in recovery.

    When Air Force veteran Tech. Sgt. Krys Bowman returned home from another deployment, his wife, Lacey, noticed changes. Addressing those changes resulted in a new way for Krys to give back and to get involved.

  • DVBIC Podcast Provides Help for Family Caregivers
    Graphic image with text "The TBI Family"

    In a small brick house in northern Baltimore, Joann Anderson-West cares for two injured Army veterans whose families are unable to provide care. One of the veterans, Ralph Stepney, was placed with Anderson-West after he reached out to the Department of Veterans Affairs for help.

    “She's family,” Stepney said, “because she treats me like family. She's a very excellent cook. She has a beautiful home, and I'm very, very comfortable here and I enjoy life again.”

    Anderson-West’s story is one of many told by the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) in its ongoing podcast series, “The TBI Family.” Her story is part of an episode that discusses foster care and cognitive rehabilitation for those with a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

  • VIDEO: Watch Service Members Share Experiences with TBI Recovery

    A Head for the Future presents three compelling stories about getting help

    Jennifer, a military spouse, spoke up when she noticed symptoms in her husband, Army Sgt. 1st Class Bradley Lee. Air Force veteran Staff Sgt. Tina Garcia used a beauty pageant to raise awareness about her injury and recovery. And Air Force veteran Tech. Sgt. Krys Bowman took up adaptive sports to support his recovery.

    Group of athletes in blue Warrior Games

    In advance of Brain Injury Awareness Month, which we recognize every March, a Defense Department traumatic brain injury (TBI) initiative released new video profiles featuring the inspiring stories of three military members who experienced brain injury and sought help to recover. The videos, released under the A Head for the Future initiative, are available on the A Head for the Future website and on the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury’s YouTube channel.

  • DOD Brain Injury Center Launches Podcast for Military Family Caregivers

    In recognition of Warrior Care Month and National Family Caregivers Month, Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) will launch a new podcast for family caregivers of service members and veterans with traumatic brain injuries (TBI) today.

    The podcast, called “The TBI Family,” will focus on providing information about TBI, sharing resources for caregivers and telling caregiver stories.

    “We know family caregivers don’t have a lot of free time, but do need access to information,” said Col. (Dr.) Geoffrey Grammer, DVBIC director. “Podcasts are a great way to get our message to caregivers in a way that works for their schedules.”

  • Taking Time Off Enabled My TBI Recovery

    On May 5, 2005, I was riding my bicycle to work at Marine Corps Base Hawaii when I was hit head-on by a careless driver. If I hadn’t been wearing a helmet, I likely would have died instantly or at least been left with extremely severe brain damage. Even with a helmet, I was still knocked unconscious and experienced a TBI. After a few days in intensive care, I was sent home under the 24-hour supervision of my mother, a registered nurse, and my fiancé, a Marine and former emergency medical technician.

    The doctors said that for a while all I was allowed to do was sleep, read or watch TV. I don’t remember much of the first couple weeks out of the hospital because I slept a lot – 12 to 16 hours a day. That’s common after a head injury, and it was all I wanted to do.

  • College Success After Traumatic Brain Injury
    Service members participate in college graduation ceremony
    Image courtesy U.S. Army

    As a service member or veteran, you have all the advantages of your military training and experience to help you succeed in college. You’ve learned the importance of discipline, dependability teamwork and how to show respect. You know how to set goals and raise the bar for everyone around you. These skills will serve you well.

    Nevertheless, entering or returning to school after a traumatic brain injury (TBI) may feel challenging. You may find yourself coping with persistent symptoms such as headaches, sleep disturbances, pain, vision and hearing problems, dizziness, and mood changes. You may also feel overwhelmed or have difficulty staying focused.

    Strong support systems at colleges and universities can help you through these challenges. However, it’s important to be your own advocate and educate yourself about what resources are available.

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