News

  • Why Helping Civilian Providers Understand Military Culture Matters
    Protecting the mental health of the force
    U.S. Army photo by Dustin Senger

    One size does not fit all when it comes to health care. As some service members and veterans feel more comfortable turning to civilian providers, providers can treat them more effectively if they understand military culture.

    Presenters at the 2015 Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Summit spoke about how civilian providers can improve their understanding of service members, veterans and their families by learning more about military culture. Providers can use free workshops and seminars, and information on programs that may assist veterans.

    “The most important thing we can do is to make an effort to know and learn about the military culture. That will help the relationship grow stronger and better,” said Kim Ruocco, chief external relations officer of the Suicide Prevention and Postvention Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors.

  • Treat Stress, Anxiety Early for Successful TBI Recovery
    Service member experiencing effects of anxiety. (DoD photo)

    Most first responders are familiar with the “golden hour”—those precious 60 minutes from the time a trauma patient is injured to when they should get medical attention. Although this magical hour remains a topic of debate among experts, most will agree that the sooner trauma is treated, the better the outcome.

    Health care providers should apply the same concept when treating patients for the stress and anxiety that accompany a traumatic brain injury (TBI), according to Dr. C. Alan Hopewell, a subject matter expert with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC).

  • You Are Virtually Invited

    What are you doing Sept. 15-19?

    A good answer is you plan to learn more about the state-of-the-science and best practices in caring for service members and veterans with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and psychological health concerns.

    Two events next week sponsored by Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) deliver practical knowledge and application of prevention and treatment strategies. These insights raise the bar on what service members and veterans should expect from military health care providers, from building resilience to recovery and support.

    “TBI Global Synapse: A Summit Without Borders,” Sept. 15-17, and “Psychological Health and Resilience Summit,” Sept. 17-19, split a week of education and training offered in both live and virtual environments.

  • Are You Stuck? Learn Coping Skills to Help You Move Forward
    A service member crawls through a mud pit
    U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Derrick K. Irions

    Moving Forward is a website that offers education and life coaching for military members. It was developed by National Center for Telehealth and Technology (T2) and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) as part of the Defense Department and VA initiative to provide collaborative and integrated mental health services to service members and veterans. Moving Forward helps you better understand your own problem-solving abilities and teaches new skills to overcome obstacles in life, both big and small.

    Below, Dr. Pam Murphy, a licensed psychologist and project lead at T2 for Moving Forward, describes the training through a series of questions we thought a service member or veteran might ask if given the chance to speak with her.

    What is Moving Forward and where can I find it?
  • Are PTSD, Smoking Related? Next DCoE Webinar Has Answer
    Kosovo Forces Training Exercise XVI
    U.S. Army photo by Spc. Michael Sharp

    We’re warned about the dangers of smoking because of its harmful effects on our health. Yet, cigarette use remains the leading cause of preventable deaths in the United States and kills 443,000 people each year, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. We know how difficult it is to stop the habit. But what about a smoker who also has posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)? What do we know about that relationship?

    Here are some facts:

    • Veterans with PTSD smoke twice as much as the national rate
    • Veterans with PTSD are heavy smokers compared to veterans without PTSD
  • Are You Stuck? Learn Coping Skills to Help You Move Forward
    Service member jumping out of a plane
    U.S. Marine Corps photo by Kowshon Ye

    A new website gives members of the military community access to an educational and life coaching program online. Developed by National Center for Telehealth and Technology (T2) and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) as part of the Defense Department and VA initiative to provide collaborative and integrated mental health services to veterans and service members, “Moving Forward” helps individuals better understand their own problem-solving abilities and teaches new skills to overcome obstacles in life, both big and small.

    Below, Dr. Pam Murphy, a licensed psychologist and project lead at T2 for “Moving Forward,” describes the training through a series of questions we thought a service member or veteran might ask if given the chance to speak with her.

    What is “Moving Forward” and where can I find it?
    “Moving Forward,” at startmovingforward.dcoe.mil, is a self-help online training course that teaches problem-solving skills to help individuals overcome life’s challenges. It’s based on a highly effective cognitive behavioral treatment program used successfully with veterans across the country for the past several years. Although many veteran centers continue to offer the program in-person, we hope this online version expands the reach of this resource to individuals who may not have easy access to VA centers and our active-duty service members.

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