News

  • Living with Depression: How to Cope with Symptoms
    Graphic by Sidney R. Hinds III, Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury

    Living with depression can make your daily life challenging. Fortunately, there are plenty of ways you can safely deal with depression to help minimize the effect it may have on your life.

    Contacting a provider is always a good first step if you are living with depression. Beyond that, consider different approaches that can help with your depression symptoms.

    • Stay active – When you have depression, you may feel a lack of motivation to engage in physical activity. You may also feel tempted to eat foods high in sugars or fats for the temporary rush they can offer. Unfortunately, not taking care of your body can compound the negative effects depression has on your mind.

     

  • Depression: Myths, Facts Backed Up By Numbers
    Graphic with text: Depression is caused by a combination of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors.
    Graphic courtesy of Deployment Health Clinical Center

    The new statistics for depression are in, and they may surprise you. Getting educated about depression is important. Take a look at these myths and facts to better understand depression, and how to approach it if you or someone you know is struggling.

    • Myth: Depression is not a wide spread issue in America.

    Fact: 6.7 percent of adults ages 18 or older had a major depressive episode in 2016, according to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

  • Transgender Care: Understanding People to Deliver Better Care
    Word art in the shape of a transgender symbol with the prominent words being gender, transgender, health and healthcare
    Graphic by Sidney R. Hinds III, Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Heath & Traumatic Brain Injury

    More than one million adults in the U.S. identify as transgender. Of those, an estimated 2,450 transgender individuals serve an active-duty role in the U.S. military.

    In order to give adequate, culturally sensitive care to these individuals, providers must understand unique stressors of the transgender experience.

    Holly O’Reilly, a clinical psychologist with the Deployment Health Clinical Center (DHCC), discussed these stressors and care options for transgender service members at the 2017 Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury annual summit.

     

  • Prevention and Intervention: Suicide
    I’m Good. But are you ready to listen? (Veterans Health Administration (VHA))

    This article is the final installment in a three-part series from the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) on helping the loved ones of service members identify the signs of brain injury and mental health issues.

    Everyone can benefit from honest conversations about mental health and suicide. Just one conversation may save someone’s life. DCoE is dedicated to suicide prevention efforts, and connecting the military community to the best resources available.

  • DCoE Summit Features Opioid Use Panel Discussion
    Approaches to opioid use disorder: getting evidence-based practices to the field in federal health care and prevention
    Graphic by Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Heath & Traumatic Brain Injury

    The annual Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) Summit convened Sept. 19-21. Among several presentations on the topics of psychological health and traumatic brain injury, was a panel discussion on the topic of opioid use disorder.

    The panel discussion, moderated by Dr. Richard Stoltz, DCoE acting director and clinical psychologist, allowed medical experts to talk about their efforts to address opioid use disorder. Panelists represented agencies such as the Defense Health Agency, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

    Dr. Melissa Christopher, a panelist and national director of VA Academic Detailing Services, provided an informative Q&A session to members of the DCoE knowledge translation team. During their discussion, Christopher talked about her work at the VA and shared thoughts on opioids and pain management.

  • Identify, Intervene: Help Your Loved One with TBI
    U.S. Air Force photo by J.M. Eddins Jr.

    This article is the second in a three-part series from the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) on helping the loved ones of service members identify the signs of brain injury and mental health issues.

    It’s not always the injured person who notices that something is “off.” In fact, it’s often a spouse or family member who recognizes the signs that something’s wrong. Many times, they are also the first to speak up. That was the case when Army Sgt. 1st Class Bradley Lee’s wife noticed her husband’s abnormal symptoms and took the risk to get him help.

    When you know what a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is, and what may happen as a result of the injury, you are more prepared to help a loved one

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