News

  • DCoE November Webinar: Holidays Apart from Family, Coping with Increased Stress
    U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Mike MacLeod

    Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) will host its next webinar, “Holidays Apart from Family: Coping with Increased Stress,” Nov. 17 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. (EST).

  • Better Coordination of Psychological Health, TBI Programs For Military Needed, RAND Study Finds

    More than 200 programs are available to help U.S. military members and their families with psychological health and traumatic brain injury issues, but better coordination of those efforts is needed, according to a new RAND Corporation study.

    The RAND project compiled the first comprehensive catalog of programs sponsored or funded by the Department of Defense to aid military members and their families with psychological health or traumatic brain injury issues. The work was sponsored by the assistant secretary of defense for health affairs and the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    “The good news is, there are a lot of programs to assist military service members who are dealing with such psychological health issues as post-traumatic stress disorder or major depression, or the short- and long-term psychological and cognitive consequences of a traumatic brain injury,” said Robin M. Weinick, the study’s lead author and a senior social scientist at RAND, a nonprofit research organization.

  • Real Warrior Ed Pulido Speaks to Veterans
    Retired Army Maj. Ed Pulido

    DoDLive hosted a bloggers roundtable Nov. 8 focused on information and resources available for veterans experiencing psychological and physical wounds of war and their families, who play a crucial role in supporting their loved ones on the battlefield and at home. The roundtable featured retired Army Maj. Ed Pulido of the Real Warriors Campaign; Dr. Mark Bates, Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE), Resilience and Prevention directorate director; Army Maj. Todd Yosick, DCoE, Resilience and Prevention directorate deputy director; and Verna Jones, American Legion, Veterans Affairs and Rehabilitation Services director, the nation’s largest veterans service organization.

    This November, as we commemorate Veterans Day and prepare for the return of U.S. service members from Iraq, I want to share my story of seeking care with other veterans, service members and families who may be facing challenges associated with reintegration or invisible wounds.

    In the summer of 2004 during my deployment to Iraq with the U.S. Army, I was on a mission driving to Kirkuk, when I suddenly hit an improvised explosive device. The blast severely injured my leg and eventually led to its amputation.

  • Sesame Workshop Helps Military Families Communicate, Connect

    Navy Capt. Paul S. Hammer, Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) director, took the stage Nov. 5 at a Sesame Street Family Fun Day hosted at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall in Arlington, Va., that brought together Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit organization behind Sesame Street and The Electric Company, DCoE and hundreds of military families.

    New resources from the television series The Electric Company and Sesame Street were unveiled, including Military Families Near and Far, a bilingual website where families can post messages to loved ones, create artwork and songs, upload photos and record video greetings. The workshop also debuted the mobile app “Feel Electric!” for the iPad, iPhone and Android markets, allowing kids to express their feelings.

    Hammer asked military kids in the audience one question:

    “How do you feel?”

    Along with Hammer, kids held up round, colorful signs that expressed their emotions.

    “Today I feel—I’m going to let it out—happy and proud,” Hammer said as he held up his sign.

    © 2011 Sesame Workshop photo by Evy Mages

    Military families were encouraged to express themselves in a positive way – or “let it out” at the event. Kids were treated to a special presentation from Sesame Street and The Electric Company characters with the theme “Let It Out!” as Jessica and Shock led the audience into a choreographed dance, encouraging them to communicate their feelings.

  • What is Generational PTSD? DCoE Webinar Presenters Explain
    U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Rachel Martinez

    “As a veteran with diagnosed [post-traumatic stress disorder], 50 percent VA compensation and a four-month-old daughter, what behaviors can I follow to reduce the chances of my daughter having problems,” asked a participant during the October DCoE monthly webinar. This veteran’s question was one of many questions the webinar entitled “Generational Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Post-traumatic Growth” aimed to address.

    Although there isn’t a genetic link that says just because you have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) you’re going to pass it on to your children, the webinar explored how an individual’s mental health problems, such as a combat veteran with PTSD, can affect their children or grandkids. DCoE clinical psychologists Drs. Anita Brown, Christopher Burke and Darlene Powell Garlington presented and, while citing historical evidence, clinical research, personal anecdotes and hypothetical case examples, provided an interesting look at how PTSD affects individuals as well as family members.

  • Registration for the Fourth Annual Trauma Spectrum Conference is Open

    The fourth annual Trauma Spectrum Conference is scheduled for Dec. 8-9 at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. This year’s event focuses on bridging the gap between research and clinical practices for psychological health and traumatic brain injury (TBI) health concerns for returning service members and veterans of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Presented by Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE), the National Institutes of Health and Department of Veterans Affairs, the conference highlights available resources and best practices for psychological health and TBI to those involved in health care, clinical practice and research for service members and veterans. Topics include cognitive rehabilitation, sleep disorders, implementation science, co-occurring disorders and integrative telehealth/mobile technologies.

    To view the agenda, information about continuing education units and general conference information, visit the Trauma Spectrum Conference website.

    Registration for the conference is now open. Media interested in attending can contact Kelley Thibodeau, DCoE media relations, at 703-604-5643 or Kelley.Thibodeau.ctr@tma.osd.mil.

    <p>The fourth annual Trauma Spectrum Conference is scheduled for Dec. 8-9 at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. This year&rsquo;s event focuses on bridging the gap between research and clinical practices for psychological health and traumatic brain injury (TBI) health concerns for returning service members and veterans of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.</p><p>Presented by <a href="/">Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury</a> (DCoE), the National Institutes of Health and Department of Veterans Affairs, the conference highlights available resources and best practices for psychological health and TBI to those involved in health care, clinical practice and research for service members and veterans. Topics include cognitive rehabilitation, sleep disorders, implementation science, co-occurring disorders and integrative telehealth/mobile technologies.</p>

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