News

  • Suicide Prevention Resources: Read Them, Share Them
    Two hands coupled at the wrist with the words - Be there, your actions could save a life.
    Graphic courtesy of Military Health System

    September is recognized as Suicide Prevention Awareness Month in the Defense Department, and also in mental health communities worldwide. At the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) our mission is to bring the military community resources on psychological health and traumatic brain injury prevention and treatment, which ultimately helps in the battle against suicide.

    We know that one of the keys to suicide prevention is getting the right resources to the right people at the right time. We rounded up some must-bookmark suicide prevention resources for everyone within the military community – service members, veterans, providers, family members, caregivers and friends. Please take a look and if you find any of them helpful, please share with others.

     

  • TBI Experts Brief Draft Consensus Statements at MHS Research Symposium
    MHSRS will be held August 27-30, 2017 at the Gaylord Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee, FL
    Graphic courtesy of Defense Health Agency

    The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DBVIC) and interagency working groups are presenting draft traumatic brain injury (TBI) consensus statements during breakout sessions at the annual Military Health System (MHS) Research Symposium. Their goal is to review the current state of the science for TBI clinical care, distill recent TBI research for use in clinical practice, and identify areas that deserve further investigation.

    Work groups conducted weekly or bi-weekly teleconferences to review evidence and draft consensus statements. Topics were developed, reviewed and approved by the TBI Advisory Committee and support the MHS TBI Pathway of Care.

  • Experts Talk Knowledge Translation, Benefits for Military Health System
    Graphic courtesy of the Defense Health Agency

    Researchers from all over the globe gathered this week at the annual Defense Department Military Health System Research Symposium (MHSRS). Known as the top military medical conference in the world, it is an academic-based venue for professionals to talk, learn and share with each other. The focus of this year’s event was how military medical experts use cutting-edge research to improve care for the warfighter.

    Dr. Richard Stoltz, Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) acting director, spoke at this year’s MHSRS. Along with colleagues, Stoltz introduced the knowledge translation process developed at DCoE. He focused his discussion on how using a systematic approach and best practices can impact military psychological health challenges.

  • Knowledge Translation: What is it, How Will it Help?

    Researchers gather at the annual Military Health System Research Symposium (MHSRS) to share new discoveries from military-unique research. This event is the only meeting that focuses on the specific medical needs of the warfighter. One topic of discussion at this year’s symposium is knowledge translation.

    On average, it takes over a decade before medical research is accepted and put into clinical practice at hospitals or clinics – too long a wait for those who need treatment. Knowledge translation can help speed that up. It’s basically a process to take medical research findings and put them into evidenced-based treatments in a more timely and useful way. A successful process is one that is standardized and adaptable.

    Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) and Defense Health Agency are working together with other agencies to standardize knowledge translation processes for the Military Health System (MHS). The overall goal is to ensure service members and veterans continue to have access to the latest and best treatments available.

  • Don’t Let TBI, PTSD Keep You from Academic Success
    Chalkboard with the words back to school on it
    Photo courtesy of U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii

    Returning to school after a traumatic brain injury (TBI) or living with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be overwhelming. Noisy settings may become problematic, complex tasks may become hard to follow, and socializing with instructors and peers may not come as easy. But if you are a student living with TBI or PTSD, you can still achieve academic success. 

    Common Struggles for Students

    Depending on your injury and where you are in the recovery process, you will likely perform at a different level than before your injury. You may notice new challenges with learning and studying that you didn’t have before. .

     

  • ‘Tech into Care’ Pilot Aims to Help Providers Use Mobile Apps with Patient Care
    The five mobile apps pictured: breathe to relax, life armor, PTSD coach, T2 mood tracker, and virtual hope box
    Graphic courtesy of Deployment Health Clinical Center

    A recent National Center for Telehealth & Technology (T2) survey explored the barriers that military health care providers face when they try to use technology with psychological health treatment. In response, Deployment Health Clinical Center (DHCC) launched a pilot program to offer solutions. The Tech into Care pilot will help providers at Navy and Air Force behavioral health clinics use five popular mobile apps with their treatment practices.
     

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